How To: My Favorite On-the-Go Cold Brew

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I love coffee. I love it so much that my Tinder bio proudly announces that "I'm a connoisseur of good books, good coffee, and good company." (Get at me, boys.) I'm a bit of a coffee snob, perhaps (although I can't imagine anyone would actually prefer that John Conti garbage to the iconic green mermaid's sweet, caffeinated nectar), but what can I say? I like what I like.

I'm also kind of particular about my coffee beverages during the summer months. Because I usually make my coffee right before I'm headed out the door on my way to work, I prefer to drink it iced instead of hot when it's 90+ degrees outside. So this summer I've refined my on-the-go coffee recipe for mornings when I'm barely able to keep my eyes open but I'm somehow already sweating. Keep reading to find out how I make my favorite iced coffee!


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I start with my favorite bougie Pike Place Roast whole beans from Starbucks. Using a (much) less bougie coffee grinder, I coarsely grind the beans so they won’t slip through the fine mesh of the cold brew pitcher. (Pro tip: when I use the same beans for my hot coffee, I add a hint of cinnamon just to spice things up a bit.) Then I fill the infuser with 14-16 tablespoons of the grounds and fill the canister almost all the way up with water.

After a full 24 hours in the fridge, with the beans fully immersed in the water, my cold brew is ready for pouring. I’m not quite sure how some people (like my sister Madison, who is a nurse) can drink black coffee–honestly, just the thought makes my taste buds stand on end–so I like a mix of almond milk and creamer to balance out the acidity and give it a little flavor.

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I fill my tumbler with several ice cubes then pour enough cold brew to leave about a quarter of the cup for the milk and a splash of creamer. For an extra bit of sweetness, sometimes I add some caramel drizzle (it’s like a Venti Iced Caramel Macchiato except a fraction of the cost) (and also made with cold brew instead of espresso) (and also way less likely to make me late for work).

After grabbing a lid and metal straw (#savetheplanet), I’m well on my way to sweet, caffeinated bliss. Although this probably can’t be considered a recipe (although I’m not sure what exactly does constitute a recipe) I hope you’ll test out these steps and tell me what you think! When it gets chillier outside, I may very well go back to my hot coffee ways, but for now I will enjoy every ounce of my homemade cold brew.


Have you ever tried making your own cold brew? How about other unique ways of making coffee like pour over or French press? Do you like to use any flavors in your morning caffeine? Leave a comment and let me know!

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